Patient Safety

Patient safety has been identified internationally as a health care priority. Adverse events (AEs), broadly defined as unintended harm to the patient that is related to health care and/or services provided to the patient rather than the patient’s underlying medical condition, represent a significant threat to patient safety and public health. To date, patient safety research has focused on admitted patients. However, most Canadians, and especially children, are more likely to visit an Emergency Department (ED) than to be admitted to hospital. Little research has been conducted on pediatric patient safety in the ED. We have no evidence about how common AEs are among children seen and treated in EDs in children’s hospitals. Such knowledge is an essential first step to understand how to improve the safety of pediatric EDs and ultimately children’s health outcomes.

The ED Research team at CHEO is conducting research to better understand patient safety in the Emergency Department. Specifically we want to learn about the frequency, severity and preventability of adverse events occurring among children in the ED. This information will help us to improve the safety of ED care for all Canadian children.

Research Projects

  1. Medications to manage end-of-life symptoms in the immediate postpartum period

    18/08/2021

    There is a need for standardization of the medical management of infants born with life-limiting conditions whose parents choose to pursue palliative care.

  2. What’s the harm in asking? A systematic review and meta-analysis on the risks of asking about suicide-related behaviors and self-harm with quality appraisal

    25/07/2020

    Unfortunately, misperceptions of harm remain which can compromise clinical care, research, and public health surveillance efforts. Our objective was to evaluate the empirical evidence on whether and how asking about suicide related behaviors (SRB), such as suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) results in harmful outcomes.

  3. Combined influence of practice guidelines and prospective audit and feedback stewardship on antimicrobial treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and empyema in children: 2012 to 2016

    30/06/2020

    Use of AAP should also be strongly considered in patients with effusions (even if no pathogen is identified), as clinical outcome appears similar to patients treated with broad-spectrum antimicrobials.

  4. Adverse events in the paediatric emergency department: a prospective cohort study

    29/04/2020

    Conclusion One in 40 children suffered adverse events related to ED care. A high proportion of events were preventable. Management and diagnostic issues warrant further study.

  5. Obstetrical safety indicators for preventing hospital harms in low risk births

    02/04/2020

    This question is: According to the available literature, what are the obstetrical safety indicators related to processes of care for low risk births that aim to reduce preventable hospital harms?

  6. Minimizing Transfusion in Sagittal Craniosynostosis Surgery: The Children’s Hospital of Minnesota Protocol

    02/05/2019

    Our protocol of preoperative EPO and iron with perioperative TXA increased the preoperative hemoglobin and was associated with a low transfusion rate without negatively impacting postoperative course.

  7. Analyses of Adverse Drug Reactions-Nationwide Active Surveillance Network: Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety Database

    04/03/2019

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major problem in modern medicine, representing up to the fourth‐highest cause of mortality.

  8. Defining and identifying concepts of medication literacy: an international perspective

    18/09/2018

    Future studies should focus on how this definition can be operationalized to support the role that pharmacists and other healthcare providers.

  9. A qualitative exploration of which resident skills parents in pediatric emergency departments can assess

    26/04/2016

    This study demystifies how parents can become involved in the assessment of residents’ NTS. The findings will inform the development of assessment strategies and could be used to develop assessment instruments that enable parents to become actively involved in the assessment of residents in pediatric EDs.

Researchers

  1. Melanie Buba

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  2. Mario Cappelli

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  3. Paula Cloutier

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  4. Aislinn Conway

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  5. Emanuela Ferretti

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  6. Donna Johnston

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  7. Robert Klaassen

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  8. Michelle Long

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  9. Claudia Malic

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  10. Amy Plint

    Senior Scientist, CHEO Research Institute

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  11. Christine Polihronis

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  12. Nicole Rouvinez Bouali

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  13. Sandy Tse

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  14. Albert Tu

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  15. Christina Vadeboncoeur

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  16. Régis Vaillancourt

    Senior Scientist, CHEO Research Institute

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