Jean-Philippe Chaput

Senior Scientist, CHEO Research Institute

Dr. Chaput is a Senior Scientist with the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group at the CHEO Research Institute and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on obesity prevention and the adoption of a healthy lifestyle. He is particularly interested in healthy behaviours such as sleep, physical activity and nutrition. Dr. Chaput has published more than 350 peer-reviewed scientific articles and is highly cited. He serves on many journal editorial boards and advisory committees and has contributed to a large number of conferences around the world.

He received several awards for his research, including the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) Young Investigator Award (2016), the Roger Broughton Young Investigator Award from the Canadian Sleep Society (2015), the International Journal of Obesity New Faculty Award from World Obesity (2014), the New Investigator Award from the Canadian Obesity Network (2011), and the New Investigator Award from the International Association for
the Study of Obesity (2010).

Related News

Research Projects

  1. World Health Organization 2020 guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour

    26/11/2020

    These guidelines should be used to inform national health policies aligned with the WHO Global Action Plan on Physical Activity 2018-2030 and to strengthen surveillance systems that track progress towards national and global targets.

  2. Advancing the global physical activity agenda: recommendations for future research by the 2020 WHO physical activity and sedentary behavior guidelines development group

    26/11/2020

    Although the 2020 WHO Guidelines for Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior were informed by the most up-to-date research on the health effects of physical activity and sedentary time, there is still substantial work to be done in advancing the global physical activity agenda.

  3. 2020 WHO guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour for children and adolescents aged 5-17 years: summary of the evidence

    26/11/2020

    Addressing the identified research gaps will better inform guideline recommendations in children and adolescents, and future work should aim to prioritize these areas of research. In the meantime, investment and leadership is needed to scale up known effective policies and programs aimed at increasing activity in children and adolescents.

  4. Sedentary behaviour and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews

    15/10/2020

    Our findings suggest that high levels of sedentary behaviour are unfavourably associated with cognitive function, depression, function and disability, physical activity levels, and physical health-related quality of life in adults. Our results also suggest that reducing or breaking up periods of prolonged sitting may have beneficial effects on markers of cardiometabolic risk and body composition. Although sedentary behaviour was generally associated with negative health outcomes, there may be favourable associations between computer and Internet use and cognitive function in older adults. Our findings have important public health implications and suggest that adults should avoid accumulating high levels of sedentary behaviour. Future work is needed to identify whether a dose–response relationship exists between sedentary behaviour and these health outcomes, and whether these relationships are consistent across sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

  5. Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18-64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep

    15/10/2020

    The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18–64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep completes the set of 24-Hour Movement Guidelines that together provide recommendations for healthy movement behaviours for the whole day for all Canadians. The Guidelines were generated based on the best available evidence with extensive consultation and stakeholder feedback. The CP recognized that to adopt and sustain any movement behaviour in today’s environment presents very real challenges for all adults. It is hoped that the shift in focus from movement behaviours in isolation to the integration of all movement behaviours over the whole day will provide movement options for adults, treatment options for practitioners, and greater opportunities for public health promotion.