Mark S. Tremblay

Senior Scientist and Director, Healthy Active Living and Obesity, CHEO Research Institute

Professor Mark Tremblay has a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Sports Administration and a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education degree from Laurentian University. His graduate training was from the University of Toronto where he obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the Department of Community Health with a specialty in Exercise Science. Dr. Tremblay is the Director of Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research (HALO) at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute and Professor of Pediatrics in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, President of the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance, Founder of the Sedentary Behaviour Research Network, Chair of Outdoor Play Canada, and Adjunct/Visiting Professor at five other universities on four continents.

Dr. Tremblay has published 500 scientific papers and book chapters in the areas of childhood obesity, physical activity measurement, exercise physiology, sedentary physiology, outdoor play and health surveillance. His h-index is 75 and his published research has been cited 22,000 times according to Scopus. He has delivered over 800 scholarly conference presentations, including more than 150 invited and keynote addresses, in 21 different countries. Dr. Tremblay received an honorary doctorate from Nipissing University, the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, the Lawson Foundation 60th Anniversary Award, the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Honour Award, the Victor Marchessault Advocacy Award from the Canadian Pediatric Society, and the Vic Neufeld Mentorship Award in Global Health Research from the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research for his leadership contributions to healthy active living in Canada and around the world. Dr. Tremblay’s most productive work has resulted from his 31-year marriage to his wife Helen, yielding four wonderful children.

Related News

Research Projects

  1. Relationships among children’s independent mobility, active transportation and physical activity: a multi-site cross-sectional study

    15/10/2020

    Keywords: active travel; children’s autonomy; pedometers; urbanization; multilevel models

  2. Introduction to the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18-64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep

    15/10/2020

    Support for the development of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18–64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: an integration of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep was provided by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Queen’s University, and ParticipACTION.

  3. Sedentary behaviour and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews

    15/10/2020

    Our findings suggest that high levels of sedentary behaviour are unfavourably associated with cognitive function, depression, function and disability, physical activity levels, and physical health-related quality of life in adults. Our results also suggest that reducing or breaking up periods of prolonged sitting may have beneficial effects on markers of cardiometabolic risk and body composition. Although sedentary behaviour was generally associated with negative health outcomes, there may be favourable associations between computer and Internet use and cognitive function in older adults. Our findings have important public health implications and suggest that adults should avoid accumulating high levels of sedentary behaviour. Future work is needed to identify whether a dose–response relationship exists between sedentary behaviour and these health outcomes, and whether these relationships are consistent across sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

  4. Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18-64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep

    15/10/2020

    The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18–64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep completes the set of 24-Hour Movement Guidelines that together provide recommendations for healthy movement behaviours for the whole day for all Canadians. The Guidelines were generated based on the best available evidence with extensive consultation and stakeholder feedback. The CP recognized that to adopt and sustain any movement behaviour in today’s environment presents very real challenges for all adults. It is hoped that the shift in focus from movement behaviours in isolation to the integration of all movement behaviours over the whole day will provide movement options for adults, treatment options for practitioners, and greater opportunities for public health promotion.

  5. Sedentary Behaviour Research Network members support new Canadian 24-hour Movement Guideline recommendations

    15/10/2020

    The authors are grateful to Dr. Jennifer Tomasone and her students, who were responsible for the administration of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults Stakeholder Survey from which the Sedentary Behavior Research Network sub-analysis was drawn.