Richard Webster

Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

Dr. Richard Webster, has an MSc in Imaging Science and a Ph.D. in Biology. Prior to joining CHEO, he was a fellow at Health Canada working in the Genomic Laboratory of the Environmental Health Centre. Dr. Webster is now the Team Lead for Health Informatics and Big Data at the Clinical Research Unit. He contributes to the Clinical Research Unit Leadership Team, CHEO RI Data Warehouse committee, EPIC Research Application Leadership Team, as well as providing biostatistical oversight for many research projects. While based at CHEO, Dr. Webster is also a consultant for the Ontario Child Health Support Unit.

Dr. Webster’s research on child health often involves utilizing health administrative data like ICES and the CHEO RI’s data warehouse. His research interests are twofold, 1) making science more impactful and cost effective with improved statistical power analysis, and 2) improving sustainable healthcare where he collaborates with the Cochrane Climate-Health Working Group and the Centre for Sustainable Health Systems.

Related News

Research Projects

  1. Risk of Mental Health Problems in Children and Youth Following Concussion: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    25/12/2021

    Among children and youths aged 5 to 18 years, concussion was associated with an increased risk of mental health issues, psychiatric hospitalization, and self-harm compared with children and youths with an orthopedic injury.

  2. Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology practices: A national survey of Canadian gynecologists

    10/12/2021

    Attention must be given to better training for our residents via available curriculums and teaching modalities, as well as increased access to CME for OB/GYNs.

  3. Global variability in seawater Mg: Ca and Sr: Ca ratios in the modern ocean

    25/08/2021

    The modern ratios’ variability is similar to the reconstructed rise over 20 Ma (Neogene Period), nurturing the question of seminonconservative behavior of Ca, Mg, and Sr over modern Earth geological history with an overlooked environmental effect.

  4. Nonauscultatory clinical criteria are sensitive for cardiac pathology in low-risk paediatric heart murmurs.

    25/08/2021

    Basic clinical criteria that do not require auscultation are highly sensitive for ruling out significant cardiac pathology in children over 12 months of age.

  5. Incidence and short-term outcomes of Kawasaki disease.

    30/03/2021

    KD incidence is increasing in Ontario, with greater healthcare utilization from hospitalizations and subsequent follow-up.