Fractures

Wrist buckle fractures are among the most common injuries in children. Until recently, the North American practice preference was to immobilize these injuries with casts. CHEO researchers have found, however, that children treated with a removable splint had better physical functioning, had fewer difficulties with activities, returned to sports sooner, and suffered no greater pain than those treated with casts.

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Research Projects

  1. Assessment of longitudinal bone growth in osteogenesis imperfecta using metacarpophalangeal pattern profiles

    27/07/2020

    COL1A1 and COL1A2 mutations affect bone growth not only by inducing fractures and bone deformities, but also through longitudinal growth deficits in bones that do not fracture or deform.

  2. The Accuracy of Prevalent Vertebral Fracture Detection in Children Using Targeted Case‐Finding Approaches

    01/11/2019

    Back pain was assessed by patient report, LS BMD was measured by dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry, and PVF were quantified on spine radiographs using the modified Genant semiquantitative method. Forty‐four patients (11.0%) had PVF.

  3. Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Skeletal Outcomes After Bisphosphonate Discontinuation at Final Height

    04/07/2019

    None of the patients sustained a new vertebral compression fracture during follow‐up.

  4. Bone Morbidity and Recovery in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results of a Six‐Year Prospective Cohort Study

    01/05/2018

    These results suggest the need for trials addressing interventions in the first 2 years of chemotherapy, targeting older children and children with more severe vertebral collapse, because these children are at greatest risk for incident VF and subsequent residual vertebral deformity.

Researchers

  1. Marie-Eve Robinson

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  2. Kevin Smit

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  3. Sandy Tse

    Investigator, CHEO Research Institute

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  4. Leanne Ward

    Senior Scientist, CHEO Research Institute

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